Walking

Best Walks and Cycle Trails of Loch Lomond & The Trossachs

Covering 720 glorious square miles, the Trossachs National Park is centred around Loch Lomond in the Southern Highlands of Scotland. Featuring 21 Munros, 22 lochs, and a vast array of habitats, it makes for the perfect playground for both booted and two-wheeled adventures. With so much on offer, we highly recommend staying here for a couple of weeks if you can, but short breaks also offer a wonderful opportunity for leisure and play. 

To get your imagination firing and your feet itching, here are some of the best walks and cycle trails of Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. 

Best Short Hikes | Loch Lomond & The Trossachs

Ben Lomond: Only narrowly pipped to the post by Ben Nevis as Scotland’s most popular climb, Ben Lomond is a natural contender for the best hike in the Trossachs National Park. If you’ve never climbed a Munro before, this is a great one to begin with. You’ll need to set aside 5 to 6 hours and have a good level of fitness. 

Conic Hill: Standing on the eastern side of Loch Lomond, Conic Hill near Balmaha is great for those looking for a decent hike without taking up the whole day. After the 45 minute (or so) ascent, you will eventually reach the top of this 361m hill and be rewarded with superb views across the loch. 

Firkin Point: A really family-friendly walk that is ideal for wheelchairs and pushchairs is the Firkin Point walk. Here, you can park in the car park and enjoy 6 miles of tarmacked path along the west bank of Loch Lomond. Should you wish to stop and admire the views, the route is also peppered with benches.

Callander Crags: Although a strenuous hike, the Callander Crag route is a well-known and popular choice. Running over 2 miles of, at times, rocky and uneven terrain, it definitely works up a sweat but softens the deal with amazing views from the top. You’ll need decent footwear and some pocket snacks for this one. 

Ben A’an: Described as a mountain in miniature, Ben A’an in the heart of the Trossachs offers another popular walk. The hill itself, although a slog, is suitable for most generations, but the summit does involve a bit more of a challenge. Once again, if the sense of achievement isn’t enough, the summit views make this hike well worth the exertion. 

Best Long-Distance Trails | Loch Lomond & The Trossachs

The Great Trossachs Path: The 30-mile Great Trossachs Path is a great long-distance route weaving its way through the National Park. Comprised of a series of short, long and circular routes that can be broken up, extended or connected to other Great Trails, it’s one of the best trails for both walking and cycling in the region. In fact, the whole trail and many of its spur routes can be biked.

The West Highland Way: Heralded by the National Geographic as one of the world’s great trails, the West Highland Way commands attention. At 96 miles long, it runs from Glasgow north to Fort William and wends through the centre of the Trossachs National Park. Just some highlights include the Highland Boundary Fault Line at Conic Hill, ancient woodlands and the Blackmount mountains.

The Rob Roy Way: From Drymen to Pitlochry, the Rob Roy Way leads you along 79 miles of tracks and trails used by the infamous 17th century outlaw, Rob Roy MacGregor. Irresistibly atmospheric in spirit, the romance and drama of the trail’s scenery will inspire awe as you cross mountains and glens and trace rivers, burns and lochs in one of Scotland’s most beautiful National Parks.

The Loch Lomond and Cowal Way: Summed up as “Scotland in 57 miles”, this stunning walk showcases the best of Scottish landscapes, including coastline, mountains, forests, and fascinating heritage sites. During your holiday in the Trossachs National Park, you should follow a section of this path along the banks of Loch Lomond and bask in the beautiful setting. 

The Three Lochs Way: Commencing in Balloch at the foot of Loch Lomond, you can easily make tracks along part of Three Lochs Way during your stay in the Trossachs National Park. At 34 miles long, the whole route can be walked in 3 to 4 days, but there are also lots of shorter day routes that are clearly waymarked. 

Best Cycle Trails | Loch Lomond & The Trossachs

West Loch Lomond Cycle Path: The West Loch Lomond Cycle Path runs for 17 miles along the west side of Loch Lomond. Starting in Balloch and ending in Tarbet, it is near to train stations at both ends and is suitable for bikes, wheelchairs and prams. Unlike many cycle trails, this cycle path is almost completely level and traffic-free, apart from two short stretches on minor roads. 

Three Lochs Forest Drive: If you are enjoying a winter holiday near Loch Lomond, the Three Lochs Forest Drive is well worth your consideration. Closed to cars over the winter months, the beautiful 7-mile route steers you past Lochan Reòidhte, Loch Drunkie and Loch Achray – each one as jaw-dropping as the next. 

Loch Ard Loop: The Loch Ard Loop is a brilliant circular route for families and those learning how to ride, with safe, off-road cycling in a gorgeous setting. Pedal up a small hill at the start and then follow the route past a picturesque lochan before descending to Loch Ard. With lovely views across the Narrows and the chance to see local wildlife, it’s a wee gem. 

Argyll Forest Park: With its extensive tracts of forest and mountain, Argyll Forest Park is one of the best destinations for mountain bikers in Scotland. There’s an extensive network of trails from Ardgartan that you can choose from, with a huge range of distances and difficulty levels to cater for all abilities. 

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